Archaeologists In Saqqara Necropolis Dig Up 13 Fully-Sealed Ancient Egyptian Coffins Dating Back 2,500 Years

by Ayoub

2020 has been a terrible year, so the whole world is trying its best to not make it even worse than it already is. So whenever archeologists discover some new unopened artifact, the whole world begs them not to open them because we can't afford another pandemic or a curse of some kind.

Archaeologists in Saqqara Necropolis managed to uncover 13 fully-sealed ancient Egyptian coffins dating back 2,500 years, and as exciting as it sounds, I hope they don't open them because we're not ready for the next phase of 2020. Unless they have some kind of technology that can detect if it could harm us or not.

via: Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities

According to Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities Facebook page, archaeologists were able to uncover 13 sealed wooden coffins in the Saqqara Necropolis in Egypt that could be as old as 2,500 years.

The amazing thing is that according to preliminary studies, these coffins have never been opened since their initial burial a couple of millennia ago and are still sealed off. This is actually quite rare because these burials are often found looted and empty.

via: Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities
via: Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities

Archeologists also believe that these 13 wooden coffins might lead them to even more discoveries. It is believed that many more are hidden inside the sides of the walls of the cache. Three sealed-up niches were found by the expedition where it's highly expected to find additional coffins.

The burial location is situated in the south of Cairo, right on the outskirts of the metropolis. It's believed that it used to be part of the capital city of ancient Egypt, the necropolis for Memphis. The coffins were found buried 11 meters, or 36 feet underground.

The inhabitants of the coffins' identities and the trades are still unknown, but studies and excavations are still continuing in hopes of getting an answer to that.

via: Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities
via: Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities

The Saqqara Necropolis is actually known for being the resting place of high-ranking nobility, officials, and working and middle-class people as well. However, you can differentiate them by the various grave goods and ornaments, and in some cases, even mummified animals, while the latter are often given normal burials.

via: Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities
via: Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities

Here's a video trailer of the discovery:

People on the internet insisted that these coffins shouldn't be opened under any circumstances:

People on the internet insisted that these coffins shouldn't be opened under any circumstances:

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